Russia Introduces Fines for Smoking in Public Places

smoking

Lower house of parliament in Russia on Tuesday, October 15, approved the final reading of a bill which tightens anti-smoking legislation in the country by introducing fines for smoking in public places. The initiators of the bill say that it would help to prevent teens and kids from smoking.

The bill is part of a large anti-smoking legislation that came into action in June current year. It establishes fines of around 3,000 rubles ($93) for smoking in public places that have “no smoking” signs. The highest fine is established for smoking in playgrounds. The bill comes into action on November 15 and it also prohibits advertising tobacco products.

Public places where smoking is prohibited include government buildings, cultural places, healthcare and educational facilities, stadiums and public transport. Ban on smoking in trains, restaurants and hotels comes into action the next year.

The law also puts restrictions on display of tobacco products in stores. Sales from retail kiosks will prohibited from June 2014, and there will be established minimum cigarettes prices. These days Russia has cheapest cigarettes in the world and some of them cost 40 rubles ($1.24) a pack.

In April Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev said that smoking ban in public places could save up to 200,000 lives every year in the country. Today Russia has the highest rates of smoking in the world.

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One Response to Russia Introduces Fines for Smoking in Public Places

  1. James says:

    I agree with this – as small children are very susceptible to the actions of those around them. Out of sight, out of mind. Children should not see adults smoking in public places, as this will only encourage them in the future. However, what about e-cigarettes? I think they would be a much better alternative during this period of transition where many are quitting smoking. Fortunately, smoking amongst youths seems to be less popular than it was, but ecigarettes seem to be a beneficial and encouraging message to send out to children – better than cigarettes full of tar and nasty chemicals.

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