New Jersey Has Worst Results in Anti-Smoking Funding

Smoking

American Lung Association in its latest report “State of Tobacco Control” writes that New Jersey is failing in funding quit smoking and tobacco prevention programs.

Each year, the American Lung Association releases such an report which contains information on implementation of state policies regarding tobacco use, cessation, prevention, taxation, and for each state gives grades.

The American Lung Association says that the main aim of the report is to take serious actions agains smoking in order to eliminate secondhand smoke and reducing smoking rates among population.

New Jersey received an “A” grade for smoke-free air, “B” grade for  cigarette tax and “F” grade for tobacco control, prevention, spending and cessation. It means that some anti-smoking efforts are successful and some are not. Deb Brown, the American Lunch Association of the Mid-Atlantic’s CEO says that regretably, New Jersey is the only state that did not invest state money into funding the New Jersey Comprehensive Control Program.

In 2003 the Comprehensive Control Program got $30 million, but funding gradually lowered and is now non-existent.  Besides this, the state fails to help smokers wanting to quit adequately, thus it takes multiple attempts to quit smoking. However, in spite of these failed anti-smoking efforts, New Jersey manages to show good results in taxing tobacco products and providing smoke-free air for employees.

Assemblyman John Burzichelli is happy to see New Jersey’s grade in the air quality category but cannot say why Gov. Chris Christie has failed to fund the smoking prevention programs.  If a person likes to smoke — it is his personal choice, but non-smokers should be protected from tobacco smoke.

In  New Jersey smoking is prohibited in workplaces, restaurants, bars, schools, childcare facilities. Today the only public places where smoking is permitted ar casinos and gambling establishments.  In  New Jersey the highest smoking rates are reported in Gloucester, Salem and Cumberland.

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